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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 56-57

Study of metabolic syndrome among health professionals in a rural eastern Indian population and its relation with quality of life


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Submission03-Jan-2018
Date of Decision25-Mar-2018
Date of Acceptance05-Apr-2018
Date of Web Publication8-Dec-2021

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, P.O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjo.sjo_25_20

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Keywords: India, metabolic syndrome, quality of life


How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Study of metabolic syndrome among health professionals in a rural eastern Indian population and its relation with quality of life. Saudi J Obesity 2018;6:56-7

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Study of metabolic syndrome among health professionals in a rural eastern Indian population and its relation with quality of life. Saudi J Obesity [serial online] 2018 [cited 2022 Jan 18];6:56-7. Available from: https://www.saudijobesity.com/text.asp?2018/6/2/56/331874



Sir,

In the last published issue of Saudi Journal of Obesity, Ghosh et al.[1] assessed the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the correlation with the quality of life among health professionals in a population of eastern India. They found a high MetS prevalence (43.7%) with a female predominance and it was associated with the poor quality of life, especially in the domains of psychological health, physical health, and social relationships.[1] I presume that the following drawback might render the study results questionable. In the study methodology, Ghosh et al.[1] obviously stated that “defining MetS: Diagnostic criteria laid down in ‘Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome’ − a joint interim statement of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), American Heart Association (AHA), World Heart Federation (WHF), International Atherosclerosis Society; and the International Association for the Study of Obesity criteria, with three abnormal findings out of five measures (abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL cholesterol, and increased blood glucose level) were used for the clinical diagnosis of MetS.” It is explicit that there are many definition criteria for MetS employed in the clinical settings and research institutions and assessment of these criteria showed inconsistent diagnostic accuracy.[2],[3] Moreover, the MetS definition criteria employed in the study of Ghosh et al.[1] is old, dating back to 2009, and it is no more worthy.[4] With the construction of the new diagnostic MetS criteria in Indian population, which was launched in 2016,[5] I assume that employing national MetS criteria could yield a better idea on the prevalence of MetS and its association with the quality of life among health professionals.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Mahmood Al-Mendalawi



 
  References Top

1.
Ghosh AK, Chaudhuri A, Kahar A, Adhya D. Study of metabolic syndrome among health professionals in a rural eastern Indian population and its relation with quality of life. Saudi J Obesity 2018;6:12-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Saad MA, Cardoso GP, Martins Wde A, Velarde LG, Cruz Filho RA. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in elderly and agreement among four diagnostic criteria. Arq Bras Cardiol 2014;102:263-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Bizuayehu Wube T, Mohammed Nuru M, Tesfaye Anbese A. A Comparative Prevalence Of Metabolic Syndrome Among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients In Hawassa University Comprehensive Specialized Hospital Using Four Different Diagnostic Criteria. Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2019;12:1877-87.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Alberti KG, Eckel RH, Grundy SM, Zimmet PZ, Cleeman JI, Donato KA et al. Harmonizing the metabolic syndrome: A joint interim statement of the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; American Heart Association; World Heart Federation; International Atherosclerosis Society; and International Association for the Study of Obesity. Circulation 2009;120:1640-5.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Mohanan PP. Metabolic syndrome in the Indian population: Public health implications. Hypertens J 2016;2:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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